Soda Bottle Drip Feeder for Garden Plants

Soda Bottle Drip Feeder is a great DIY Project.

Drip feeders are great for a variety of different vegetables, perennials and annuals.  Many plants prefer the moisture at their roots rather than overhead sprinklers which can encourage some leaf problems.  There are many retail products available but this Soda Bottle Drip Feeder makes use or recycled materials and works really well.Tomato Plant Soda Bottle Drip Feeder

Watering from the root area instead of overhead encourages a plant to develop and healthy root system and prevents fungus and other problems that overhead watering encourages.   You can, of course, use a retail drip feeder hose for the task, (affiliate link) but this handy DIY tip will help your plants and make watering an easy chore.

Just take a large 2 liter soda bottle  (BPA free is best for this use on vegetables, but normal soda bottles are fine for flowers and shrubs), and use barbeque skewers to poke holes in it.  (I’d use less holes than this image shows so that it would be a very slow release but it depends on how dry your soil gets.) Chemicals: Be sure to click here to jump to the bottom of this post to see one of my reader’s tips for making this type of project with terra cotta pots, if you are nervous about plastics leeching out with vegetables.

Insert the soda bottle into the space next to the plant when it is young and leave the top off. Leave the top exposed. When it gets empty, just top it up from the hose.

This is a great image shared from a Russian Gardening page that demonstrates the project well.

The popularity of this post has been amazing.   It is extremely popular on Pinterest thanks, in a large part to this pin which has gone viral this week.  Thank you to all the readers for the comments.  Here are some of my favorite ways that readers of the page are using this idea in their gardens:DIY Soda Bottle Drip Feeder for Garden Plants

  • Use rain water collected as the source of the water that you add to the bottle for extra pure watering source. (love this idea!)
  • Placing the bottle in a nylon stocking keeps most of the dirt out of the bottle.
  • Milk bottles are larger than liter bottles and will water for longer than soda bottles.
  • Insert a funnel into the top of the open bottle to make watering easier.  (this sometimes catches the rain too!)
  • Freeze the water in the bottle first.  It makes it so much easier to poke the holes.  Thanks for this tip Connie!
  • Marla, a reader of the blog, inserted a water meter near the roots and says that there is still moisture after three days of non watering in 100 degree heat!  Amazing to know, Marla!
  • Sterling suggests cutting the top 2-1/2″ from the soda bottle, flip it over and put it back into the bottle that was left from cutting. with the top removed. This way, the main part of the bottle still holds the water and the upside down top acts as the funnel. and little will be lost to evaporation. Great tip Sterling!
  • Joyce suggests this:  just cut the top off a smaller soda bottle & attach it as a funnel? Or use a 2nd bottle the same size, cut the top off & clip the screw-on part so it can be forced into the soaker bottle.  These are all great ways if you have no funnel.
  • Jennifer did this with milk jugs last year.  She says “One thing no one told me was to put a hole/holes in the very bottom of the jug. All my holes were about an inch from the bottom so there was always an inch of water sitting in the jug. That inch of water grew algae and I lost 2 cucumber plants. This should work great if you put some holes in bottom so it can all drain completely.”  Great tip Jennifer!
  • If you don’t like the idea of plastics near vegetables, this idea is great for other perennials that like watering such as Elephant’s ears, Canna Lilies, creeping Jenny and Ostrich Ferns.Elephants Ears
  • Bob says he tried the soda technique and found it labor intensive. Instead he suggests this: Use a piece of PVC pipe with a funnel at the top to fill the bottle. And mark the bottle tops with something that they stand out so to make it easier to find when you go looking. You may also want to add liquid fertilizer during the growing season as needed.
  • Celesta suggests this:  Try gluing your funnel into a convenient length of PVC pipe for your height. (affiliate link) This will save a lot of bending to get the water into the neck of the bottle.  It also makes it easier to spot in the garden too!
  • Jennifer suggests this tip for plants that do not like so much water.  Poke a hole in the bottom fill and put cap on to adjust the rate of the drip(the tighter the cap the slower the flow) Jennifer also ties hers to the stake so they don’t blow away.
  • Sitting water can attract mosquitoes. Jess suggests this tip:  When she does this in her raised vegetable garden, she leaves the caps on and unscrew them as needed. Otherwise I get mosquitoes hanging around and tree seeds in them. It works amazingly well though. Tomatoes love it! 
  • Karla suggested this tip: Have smaller bottles filled with water to add to the opening so you don’t need a hose.
  • Wayne has an interesting tip for moisture on Tomatoes in general.  He suggests mixing sheet rock from remodeling works for those with clay soils.  He suggests mixing with straw. This helps break down and loosen clay bound soils. you can also add sand from rivers. This should improve soil conditions tremendously.
  • Chrissy has a similar idea. She uses a 5 gallon pail, and drills holes all around i the she planted tomato plants all around it, and filled it with manure. Each time she filled the pail to water her tomatoes, the tomatoes received a healthy dose of poo stew. Chrissy ended up having massive tomato plants, and more tomatoes then she knew what to do with.  Thanks for this tip, Chrissy, and I absolutely love the term “poo stew!”

If you have tried this technique and had success, please leave your tips in the comments below.  I will update the article periodically with your ideas.

CHEMICALS

Note on the plastic bottles and chemicals forming.

Some of my readers have express concerns about the possibility of chemicals forming in plastic bottles and leaching out into the near by soil. Terra Cotta Pots also make a great drip feeder

Belinda, a reader of the blog has a great tip.  She suggests doing a similar idea with 2 terra cotta pots (unglazed). Fill in the hole of one with waterproof caulking. Then, Iine the other make the hole a little bigger for easy watering. Then you just seal the wide end of the two together, and then bury them next to your plants, leaving the top hole uncovered. Belinda uses a shard from an old pot to cover the hole after watering – and a funnel helps to water. Because the terra cotta pots are not is glazed, the water leaks out slowly.   This idea  takes more room in the garden than a bottle because it’s wider, but it is a great idea if you are concerned about the possibility of chemicals from the plastic bottles.  You can adjust the pot size for the size of the plant you are growing and also how often you water.

Even inserting an unglazed terra cotta pot in the ground near plants will work, since the unglazed clay will allow the seepage of water out the sides of the pot.

I really appreciate this tip Belinda.  Many readers have expressed concern about the possibility of plastics leeching chemicals and this gives them a great DIY alternative.

If you are looking for a similar idea that uses water from a glass bottle, try this Plant Nanny Wine Bottle Stake Set.  (affiliate link)  These nifty bottle holders are designed so that a recycled wine bottle rests securely inside; providing a ready supply of water.  They are intended to water a large container plant.Plant Nanny stakes

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are "affiliate links." This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive a small commission from the sale, but the price is the same for you. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  95 comments for “Soda Bottle Drip Feeder for Garden Plants

  1. Inez Kelley
    04/24/2013 at 11:01 am

    this is a very good idea especially when their is a drought and it does not rain much.

    • admin
      04/24/2013 at 3:12 pm

      I am going to try it with my tomatoes this year.

    • miles
      04/15/2015 at 2:01 pm

      Bury Soaker hoses work great.

      • Julie
        04/17/2015 at 1:17 pm

        Would I just cut pieces/length off of an old hose and “plant” in container? Won’t the water just run out the end.?

  2. Gary Kuykendall
    05/01/2013 at 11:49 am

    I’ve got 5 tomatoe plants I plan to try this with

    • admin
      05/01/2013 at 1:28 pm

      Hope it works for you. I’m doing it this year too.

  3. Anonymous
    05/01/2013 at 9:42 pm

    We are in the 3rd year of a drought here, so this idea will work with the rain water that we catch from the drain pipe.

    • admin
      05/02/2013 at 6:20 am

      last summer was horrible for us with dryness. This year seems to be starting wet and cold but I’m sure that will change.

  4. Steve
    05/11/2013 at 8:27 pm

    I am going this with 1 leter Gatorade Bottles and 1/2and 1gal plastic milk bottles for planters

    • admin
      05/14/2013 at 8:49 pm

      hope it works for you. Make the holes very small.

      Carol

      • humberto
        06/02/2013 at 1:42 pm

        I love this idea! would it work well with any plants?

        • admin
          06/04/2013 at 8:18 pm

          Most plants would be okay. Some don’t like wet feet so it would not work for them. (succulents styles, etc)

      • Miles
        04/14/2014 at 11:13 pm

        What do you consider small holes, 1/8″? How many holes do you suggest?

    • Connie
      05/15/2013 at 6:19 pm

      Steve I am doing the same with non refundable plastic jugs. (milk, gatorade, some water and soda bottles and also very cleaned out bleach bottle) I also used funnels I purchased at the dollar store and inserted them into the tops of the bottles last year. Made it easier to fill and when we did have rain it did catch some to assist in the filling. I use this method in my container plants and hangers as well at our weekend cottage.

      • lynn
        05/09/2015 at 10:09 pm

        Love the funnel idea. Just buried my gal milk jugs with my tomatoes yesterday

  5. Connie
    05/15/2013 at 6:20 pm

    ps another hint is to freeze the water in the bottles first then poke holes. Makes it so much easier to poke the holes and safer for you as well as not collapsing the bottle. You only need to do the freeze 1 time. After the holes are poked plunk them out in the garden

    • admin
      06/04/2013 at 8:19 pm

      great tip!

    • Holly
      01/30/2014 at 10:49 am

      awesome idea! thanks!

    • Marty
      05/24/2014 at 5:13 pm

      What a great tip from Connie.

  6. 05/16/2013 at 8:57 pm

    I live in AZ and the heat always does my tomatoes in. Seen this idea early in the year and put them in when I planted the tomatoes. My tomatoes are looking good and I have a gauge to check moisture down by the roots. There is moisture after 3 days of not being watered. That is with 100 degrees! I am very pleased. The idea of someone putting a funnel at the top will help. I wonder if just cutting the bottom off and put the screw top in first would work. Will try that.

    • Sterling
      03/21/2014 at 8:51 am

      if you did it that way, the potential for the water to evaporate quickly is there. instead, maybe try this. cut the top 2-1/2″ from the sada bottle, flip it over and put it back into the bottle that was left from cutting. with the top removed. This way, the main part of the bottle still holds the water and the upside down top acts as the funnel. and little will be lost to evaporation.

      • admin
        03/21/2014 at 10:23 am

        Good tips Sterling!

      • Marty
        05/24/2014 at 5:15 pm

        Another great tip!

      • Joyce Bates
        03/19/2015 at 2:06 am

        Why not just cut the top off a smaller soda bottle & attach it as a funnel? Or use a 2nd bottle the same size, cut the top off & clip the screw-on part so it can be forced into the soaker bottle. All kinds of possibilities.

        • admin
          03/19/2015 at 10:19 am

          Good tips Joyce. Thanks for sharing them. Carol

      • Kaity
        04/14/2015 at 4:27 am

        STERLING you have great ideas to make better an already excellent concept!!!!!!!!!! Thank You!!!!

  7. Debbie Buckelew
    05/26/2013 at 6:47 am

    Awesome , I think tis will solve my yellow leaf prblem. Thank you fr this post.

    • admin
      08/01/2013 at 6:47 pm

      my pleasure.

  8. Jennifer
    05/26/2013 at 10:40 am

    I did this last year with milk jugs. One thing no one told me was to put a hole/holes in the very bottom of the jug. All my holes were about an inch from the bottom so there was always an inch of water sitting in the jug. That inch of water grew algae and I lost 2 cucumber plants. This should work great if you put some holes in bottom so it can all drain completely.

    • admin
      06/04/2013 at 8:20 pm

      Another great tip. Thanks!

    • Holly
      01/30/2014 at 10:50 am

      thanks for this post! i wouldn’t have thought of it!

    • Marty
      05/24/2014 at 5:16 pm

      Gosh, there are some smart gardeners on this site.

  9. Karen
    05/31/2013 at 10:53 am

    I would like to try this with a couple young trees and see if that works. Living in Arizona and heading into the hottest part of the year, I think this will help the trees tremendously.

  10. Bob
    07/30/2013 at 2:55 pm

    I tried this a few years ago to water my tomatoes and it turned out to be a lot of work. I had several 4X4 beds between bending over, finding the bottle neck and getting the majority of the water in the bottle was more than I wanted. IF I were to do it again I would suggest a piece of PVC pipe with a funnel at the top or (less desirable) some plastic tubing with one end in the bottle and the other end with a funnel. Also mark your bottle tops with something that stands out so it is easy to find when you go looking. You may say I just want to water my plants that is fine. However you may also want to add liquid fertilizer and other stuff during the growing season as needed.

    Happy gardening…

    • Bob
      07/30/2013 at 2:59 pm

      I wanted to clarify a little. My suggestion is for one piece of PVC to fill the bottle not one for each bottle unless you happen to have PVC laying around.

      • admin
        08/01/2013 at 6:48 pm

        thanks for the tips Bob. Always great to hear one way or another how a suggestion works for readers.

        Carol

  11. Khaled
    01/30/2014 at 9:34 am

    A very cheap way to save Expensive $$ :)

  12. Holly
    01/30/2014 at 10:51 am

    i absolutely love this idea! thank you! can’t wait to try it this year!

    • admin
      01/30/2014 at 10:59 am

      HI Holly. Glad you like it. There is nothing like water right to the roots!

      Carol

  13. San
    01/31/2014 at 3:05 pm

    When do you plant the bottle at the same time as the plant you are growing?

    • admin
      01/31/2014 at 4:12 pm

      That would be ideal San, otherwise, you will disturb the roots if you try to do it later.

    • Christina
      04/16/2015 at 12:39 am

      Yes and mark the spot where the top of the bottle is .

  14. Antonio Lopes
    03/18/2014 at 7:06 am

    Great idea. Tks for posting.
    :-)
    I have physallis, goji, blueberry, raspberry…
    Is it ok with this plants?

    • admin
      03/18/2014 at 11:37 am

      I would think that it would work with all plants except for those that like to be kept dry.

      Carol

      • Antonio Lopes
        03/19/2014 at 8:06 am

        :-)
        Tks

  15. Debbie L.
    03/18/2014 at 7:34 am

    I will be using this in a large container I have at my seasonal campsite for growing a few veges as I am only there once a week. This will insure the plants stay watered

  16. Gay Crawford
    03/18/2014 at 10:37 am

    I would think that while the plants are small, one would need to add a little extra water right to the soil, since the roots will not extend down very far yet, so all the water will drain out below where the roots are.

    • admin
      03/18/2014 at 11:37 am

      Yes I agree Gay. I’m thinking of the more for somewhat established plants. Carol

  17. david lefebvre
    03/18/2014 at 9:33 pm

    I am a 74 year old retired aircraft painter living in Fla. raised on a farm if they knew of this back then the whole world would be better today Thanks for sharing love your little sites
    RED

  18. Divest from fossil Fuel
    04/23/2014 at 10:04 pm

    Can I place multiple plants around one bottle?

    • admin
      04/28/2014 at 11:52 am

      You could try more than one, but I doubt the water amount would do much good for multiple plants.
      Carol

  19. Celesta Ellis
    05/11/2014 at 11:52 am

    Try gluing your funnel into a convenient lenth of PVC for your height. Saves a lot of bending to get the water into the bottle neck.

    • admin
      05/11/2014 at 12:26 pm

      Great tip Celesta. Thanks!
      Carol

  20. tim
    05/12/2014 at 8:33 pm

    Watering from the bottom encourages roots to grow deep for a more healthy plant. Top watering makes for shallow roots and more disease prone

  21. cindy phillips
    05/15/2014 at 3:11 pm

    When it is time to ‘feed’ your garden, can you put liquid feed right into the bottles instead? I’m thinking you would have to only put a small amount of the feed in as to not overwhelm the plant. Has anybody tried this?

  22. admin
    05/15/2014 at 6:55 pm

    Hi Cindy,
    I don’t feed my tomato plants with anything other than compost but I don’t think putting fertilizer in the bottle would be a good idea. It would get too close to the roots, I think, and might burn the plants. Carol

  23. kathleen Hotze
    05/20/2014 at 10:27 am

    I wonder if you put manure in the bottle as well, if it would act as a slow release fertilizer

  24. Mariagrazia
    05/20/2014 at 1:46 pm

    It sounds like a very good idea but I am a little concerned about the holes filling with dirt blocking the water from dripping in the ground. Anyone had problems with their holes getting clogged?
    Thanks!

    • admin
      05/26/2014 at 1:58 pm

      I think the water would just seep through even if dirt got into the holes. Carol

  25. Bobbie Gaines
    05/24/2014 at 4:48 pm

    I drill holes in half gallon milk jug.The holes are on the side next to the plant.I also dig the hole big enough for the plant and the jug set the plant & jug in the hole and fill in around them leaving a little of the neck of the jug sticking out of the hole.

    • admin
      05/26/2014 at 2:04 pm

      Hi Bobbie. Thanks for the tip. Gallon jugs would probably work too and would hold more water. Carol

  26. Jennifer
    05/24/2014 at 10:18 pm

    And for those plants that don’t like wet roots…poke a hole in the bottom fill and put cap on to adjust the rate of the drip(the tighter the cap the slower the flow) I’ve tied mine to the stake so they don’t blow away :)

    • admin
      05/26/2014 at 1:57 pm

      good tip Jennifer.

  27. Abbi
    06/05/2014 at 10:35 pm

    This is slightly off subject, but I am watering some inside plants from the bottom.(I have a thirsty cat so not all are done this way..) Question is how often do I add water, do I let it run dry or keep mostly full? One small plant is up high and sucks up water instantly as is full of young parsley, which get transplanted tomorrow am. Great site. Love all the hacks!!

    • admin
      06/05/2014 at 10:39 pm

      Hi Abbi,

      It really depends very much on the plant. Some need more than others. My rule of thumb is to poke a finger into the soil. If it dry down to the first knuckle, I water it.

      I try not to let plants sit in water in the saucer, as this can rot the roots of most of them.
      Carol

  28. Ceil
    06/12/2014 at 8:02 am

    Am going to try this with my tomatoes.
    Will this work with outside annuals & perennials as well as veggies? I have lamp posts that don’t get hit by the sprinklers that are surrounded by flowers.

    • admin
      06/12/2014 at 10:53 am

      Hi Ceil. Yes it will work with any plant other than those that like dry conditions. It’s really just a home made drip feeder.

      Carol

  29. Jess
    06/17/2014 at 12:11 pm

    When I do this in my raised vegetable garden, I leave the caps on and unscrew as needed. Otherwise I get mosquitoes hanging around and tree seeds in them. It works amazingly well though. Tomatoes love it!

    • admin
      06/17/2014 at 5:42 pm

      Great tip Jess. Thanks for sharing. Carol

    • Joann
      10/12/2014 at 11:51 pm

      Hey Jess,
      Did you fertilize your tomatoes through the bottles? If so was there any issues?
      Thanks
      Joann

      • admin
        10/13/2014 at 10:22 am

        hi Joann. No I didn’t do that. I think I might be concerned about the amount of fertilizer near the roots, so wouldn’t suggest it. Carol

  30. Miche
    07/05/2014 at 9:45 pm

    This idea may appeal to some but I think there are better ways to water/maintain hydration to the garden. Not a real fan of burying plastic w my awesome veggies. Some how my grandmother who had several gardens over her 106 years never resorted to this. Would rather use organic mulch, from nature /barn cleanings. Jmo

  31. Carol
    09/25/2014 at 11:29 pm

    Has anyone considered the chemicals that will leach into the soil from the plastic? If you are growing organic food, that would matter.

  32. 10/06/2014 at 5:55 pm

    I am at the planning stages of my garden now, but it is occurring to me..
    1) what about if I bury a larger bottle with the holes just as suggested (each in the respective locations),
    2) then have a second smaller bottle(s) in my gardening desk/bench that would fit inside the buried one.
    3) Fill all the bottles needed with water and fertilizer (if),
    4) then put them inside of the buried plastic bottle?

    That way, I don’t have to go around with my hose filling each plastic bottle? May sound like a circus.. but as I work full time and still want to have a nice garden, I would need to optimize my watering time as much as possible.

    Also, the buried bottle could have a nice bamboo stick for reference, just to make sure it is not lost between the veggie foliage.

    Just saying.. 😉

    • admin
      10/06/2014 at 6:35 pm

      Hi Karla. Great idea. Anything that saves time is a winner for me. Carol

  33. Jan
    01/04/2015 at 5:14 pm

    My youth group and I are going to plant a garden this spring. We’re going to plant some tomatoes and other vegetables in straw bales. Would this be a good way to water in straw?

    • admin
      01/04/2015 at 9:33 pm

      Hi Jan. I have not tried growing tomatoes in staw, but it is supposed to conserve water. This method would work but might need less water than tomatoes grown in soil.

      Carol

  34. Kim
    01/18/2015 at 1:24 am

    I think this will work with my cucumbers. The last couple years I have had trouble with mold my question how many water bottles per area? Should I have one per hill or one per plant?

    • admin
      01/18/2015 at 12:17 pm

      Hi Kim. I have not tried this with cucumbers but I should think it would work for any plant that likes moisture at the root area. Not sure on the number of bottles, but one bottle does not hold much water, so I would not think that one would do a whole hill.
      Carol

  35. 02/12/2015 at 4:21 pm

    This will be perfect for when we’re traveling. I love to garden, but don’t like to ‘babysit’ my garden all season long. Using this method will free me up for small road trips and such. : )

  36. T Elwood
    04/02/2015 at 7:26 am

    This is an awful idea for growing anything you plan on eating! I wish people would stop touting it as a great idea.

    The heat from the soil and repeated addition of water will cause petrochemicals from the plastics to leech into the soil and into your vegetables.

    Why do you think we’re advised not to reuse plastic bottles more than a few times?

  37. Carol
    04/08/2015 at 10:21 am

    I love this idea but not sure what plants I should not do this for.
    Do you have an idea? I plant peppers,sweet potatoes, corn, zucchini, green beans, tomatoes, carrots.

    • admin
      04/08/2015 at 10:25 am

      Hi Carol. I would not do it for root vegetables like potatoes, carrots, beets, etc. But above ground plants normally need quite a bit of water and could benefit from this. The key really is to keep the water off the top of the plant and near the roots where it belongs, to help maintain moisture and prevent disease.

      Carol

  38. Patricia
    04/13/2015 at 9:57 pm

    We have clay soil that gets deep cracks in the summer time making it hard to water anything because it runs into the cracks. Its especially hard to get a tree going. Last year I planted a tree and put a 2″ pvc pipe into the ground while planting. It has about 3 feet above ground and a foot below. Last summer I often just put the water hose into the pipe and filled it to overflowing. I am proud to say that tree is leafing out beautifully right now. We made it!

    • admin
      04/13/2015 at 10:41 pm

      Hi Patricia. That’s a great idea…very much the same technique. Glad to hear your tree is doing well. I have to deal with clay soil too. Makes it hard!
      Carol

      • wayne
        04/20/2015 at 12:58 am

        Sheet rock from remodeling works for clay soils, mix with straw or hay. Helps break down and loosen clay bound soils. Can also add sand from rivers. When mixed with big tomatoes compost should improve conditions tremendously.

  39. Belinda
    04/14/2015 at 8:56 am

    I’ve done this with 2 terra cotta pots (unglazed). Fill in the hole of one with waterproof caulking. In the other make the hole a little bigger for easy watering. Seal the wide end of the two together, and then bury next to your plants, leaving the top hole uncovered. I use a shard from an old pot to cover the hole after watering – and a funnel helps to water. Because the terra cotta isn’t glazed, the water leaks out slowly. It takes more room in the garden than a bottle because it’s wider, but it’s all natural if you’re worried about chemicals. You can adjust the pot size for the size of the plan you have and how often you water.

    • admin
      04/14/2015 at 9:34 am

      Hi Belinda. LOVE this idea. Many people have commented on the use of plastic, so this is a great alternative! Carol

  40. Chrissy
    05/01/2015 at 8:11 pm

    I have done this before, I used a 5 gallon pail, and drilled holes all around it…planted tomato plants all around it…and filled it with manure. Each time I filled the pail to water my tomatoes, the tomatoes received a healthy dose of poo stew. I ended up having massive tomato plants, and more tomatoes then I knew what to do with.

    • admin
      05/01/2015 at 9:27 pm

      What a great idea Chrissy. I love the term poo stew. Too funny! Carol

  41. Bec
    05/09/2015 at 8:07 pm

    hi,
    I used this method this summer (Australia), I found that you get better seepage from many small holes rather than larger. I made the holes with a hot needle which did the job well.
    I “planted” the smaller bottles right in the middle off hanging baskets of lettuce, I would add it’s important to water the soil around the bottle from time to time.

  42. Jonmcb
    05/10/2015 at 11:42 am

    I used 20 oz soda bottles and a hot soldering iron to make the holes. Goes through like a knife in soft butter.

    I also hooked it up to my drip system. I used a flag dripper and ran a 1/4″ tube down inside the bottle. I left the cap on and melted a hole in the top big enough for the tube to get through. No worry about refilling.

    • admin
      05/10/2015 at 9:08 pm

      great tips Jon! Carol

  43. 05/24/2015 at 5:36 pm

    this is terrific, pinned to my in the garden board. Thank you for sharing at the Thursday Favorite Things blog hop xo

    • admin
      05/24/2015 at 9:52 pm

      Thanks! Glad you liked the article. Carol

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