DIY Hose Guides – Easy Gardening Project

DIY Hose Guides for Pennies

Do you have something special that you use for hose guides?  I do now, thanks to a project that wasn’t supposed to happen for a while.  With just a few easy to find supplies and a bit of time, these DIY hose guides were made!Make your own hose guides with rebar and plastic golf balls. thegardeingcook.com

One of my “next year’s” projects ended up being a this year event.  I laid 800 square feet of cardboard, newspaper, oak leaves, soil, compost, and garden clippings over the lawn in a part of my back yard in a lasagne style garden bead.

The original intention was to have the grass killed for next year, so that I could till the area and wouldn’t have to remove all that grass by hand.  (after digging 44 hours for my front garden bed to till and aerate the soil, I had had enough of digging for a while!)

Little did I know when I put down everything to kill the grass that it would be workable in just a few months.veggie-garden

I had put in a small veggie garden earlier in the spring.  I called it that, but in reality it was just a small side bed with some crowded vegetables.  I got one ear of corn, some beans, and about 2 weeks worth of peas out of it, as well as a few strawberries that the birds got, and some cucumbers that keep going yellow.

Even though my efforts weren’t very successful, it did make me realize that I, while I love flower gardening, I ADORE veggie gardening.  There is something so satisfying in the knowledge that the food on our table is something I actually grew.

The new veggie garden was planted in June and July, as well as a few plantings this past week in August when I returned from vacation. Our last frost here in NC is October 27th, I believe, so there is plenty of growing time, and the garden is producing already.

But watering it has become quite an exercise in avoiding the plants at the front of the garden between some of my rows.  No matter how careful I am, I seem to trample the plants on the outer edges of the garden with my hose.

I looked into purchasing hose guides,  and these are great looking cast irons ones, but I needed 10 or 12 of them, but at $10 each, that can add up.  So I made some of my own.  Not as fancy as the store bought kind by any means but I think they will do the trick.

My husband’s friend Tom generously agreed to cut me 12 pieces of 24″ rebar for my DIY hose guides.  (not new…he had it laying around and cut it for me for free.)  I pounded them into the soil today and realized to my horror that they are EXACTLY the same color as my soil.  It was an accident just waiting to happen.  I knew I would forget there were there and end up on my face each day in the garden.

The orange color makes these DIY hose guides easy to see.

I knew I needed something to alert me to the fact that the rebar is on the edges, so I went shopping and purchased a package of plastic orange golf balls.  They had small holes in them.  I just cut into a group of three to make a larger hold and topped each piece of rebar, and ended up with enough for each row entry.  Grand cost to me was 33c each for my DIY hose guides.  (I love saving money!  LOL)

Here they are:

These hose guides keep the hose off my vegetables

 Now my only problem is what my two large German Shepherd doggies will think when they see those 10 orange balls sitting there on the edge of the “THAT’S MINE!! AREA,  OUT!!”

There is only so much that Ashleigh and Sassy can do to obey.  This may be a bit too much of a temptation.  Time will tell.  (it’ll also tell how well they work as hose guides.  LOL)

What sort of set up do you have in your garden for hose guides?

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